Come Back Over!

Sermon Scripture

Luke 15:11- 32 The Parable of The Lost Son

Come Back Over!  Luke 15:11-32 shows us the heart of God the Father for all of us.  We have all gone astray and need to return to God.  Luke 15 captures the heart of God and will hopefully inspire and motivate us to fling off the chains of our younger/older brother lifestyles and embrace the Father.

Luke 15 highlights the two brothers and their relationship with their Father.  The Younger brother has some clear defiance toward the Father, and a strong desire to leave the relationship altogether.  The Older brother, likewise, has a skewed view of the Father and desires what the Father can give him over the relationship itself.

  • The younger brother asked for his inheritance while his Father was still alive.  This is equivalent to saying, “I wish you were dead,” or “you’re dead to me.”  This highlights the major rift this son has with his Father.>
  • The older brother is angered that his obedience didn’t’ gain him favor or control of his Father’s possessions.  He was furious to see how his Father chose to use what was his.
  • Both sons valued the Father for what he could give them, but valued little their relationships with their Father.  They wanted their Father’s stuff, but not the Father.  They have put “goods over God.”

Luke 15 forces us to see our hearts and how much we really value the Father’s desire to have a relationship with us.  What do we value more? What God gives/creates/shares with us, or Him alone?

  • Even if you’re in Christ, we can have the tendencies of these brothers to care little about the Father and much about His stuff and how He decides to employ it in our lives.
  • We want to value the gift of being with the Father over all things.
  • We want to obey not so we can try to control God’s deployment of his resources, but because we really enjoy the relationship itself.  Obedience helps us see the beauty of God even more, doesn’t it?

Luke 15 truly highlights the heart of God towards these two brothers who clearly value what they can get from God over God himself.  How does the Father respond two idolatrous sons?  Seeing the beauty of the Father’s response is what can break us free from putting “goods over God.”

  • Note how the Father responds to the younger brother.  This is unheard of.  What would you do?  I wouldn’t be running to give him the best, I’d be running to give him a piece of my mind!  The Father proceeds to give him all the best and all the honor. For what?
  • Note how the Father responds to the older brother.  He is equally obstinate and disrespectful for not attending the party his Father had organized.  What does the Father do?  Like the younger son, he too, comes to to meet him.  This is the heart of God for us.  God always comes out to us to call us to come back over.
  • This is who the heavenly Father is for all of us.  He is constantly calling us to come back over.

Luke 15 also gives us the insight of who Jesus is for each and everyone of us.  The elder brother in this parable is an awful brother.  Does he well up with excitement for the return of his own flesh and blood?  Does he acknowledge the responsibility to seek him out and help him?  

  • But we do have an elder brother who is not like that in Jesus.  We have an older brother who was willing to pay a major cost to celebrate our return to the Father.  Not the fattened calf, but his own body would be slaughtered.
  • We have an elder brother who was willing to be stripped naked, so we could be robed in righteousness.
  • An elder brother who was a son who became a slave, so we as slaves, could become sons and daughters of God.
  • We have a elder brother who was a priest who became the sacrifice so that we could become a holy priesthood
  • If we can get a glimpse of how beautiful that is:  if we go after that, let it compel us, move us, and inspire us!  It is the love of the Father, and our Elder Brother in Jesus that inspires us to come back over.

Sermon Points:

  1. Goods over God
  2. Head Over Heels
  3. Beauty Over Duty

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